analyzing and interpreting data related to stroke patients, including their demographics, medical history, and treatment outcomes, using statistical tests and measures.

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analyzing and interpreting data related to stroke patients, including their demographics, medical history, and treatment outcomes, using statistical tests and measures.

Question 1
How are the values of Charleson Score distributed for our stroke patients? Is it normally distributed, or not?
Yes, Charleson Score is normally distributed.
No, Charleson Score is not normally distributed.
Question 2
The mean and the median values are the same for completely normally distributed data. How much do they differ when looking at the patient’s age in this dataset?
Fill in just the value, i.e. 4.7, without labels.
Integer, decimal, or E notation allowed
Question 3
What is the mean SASI (Stroke Administrative Severity Score) Index for patients who have a history of Acute Ischemic Stroke and those who don’t?
Fill in just the value, i.e. 4.7, without labels.
a. Enter the mean SASI for patients who have a history of Acute Ischemic Stroke:
Integer, decimal, or E notation allowed
Question 4
What is the mean SASI (Stroke Administrative Severity Score) Index for patients who have a history of Acute Ischemic Stroke and those who don’t?
Fill in just the value, i.e. 4.7, without labels.
b. Enter the mean SASI for patients who do not have a history of Acute Ischemic Stroke:
Integer, decimal, or E notation allowed
Question 5
We’re going to assume for the purposes of this exercise that the Age variable is a normally distributed continuous variable. Is the mean difference in age for patients who died during hospitalization and those who didn’t statistically significant at p<0.05? Yes, the difference in mean age between the groups is statistically significant. No, the difference in mean age between the groups is not statistically significant. Question 6 Is the SASI (Stroke Administrative Severity Score) Index of the stroke patients normally or non-normally distributed? The mean SASI score is normally distributed. The mean SASI is not normally distributed. Question 7 What is the mean total patient charge in this data set? *When entering your answer, omit the $ and any commas from your answer, i.e. $31,892.92 should be entered as 31893* Integer, decimal, or E notation allowed Question 8 Assume that the Charlson score is not normally distributed and that it is a continuous variable. Is there a statistically significant difference in Charlson Score for patients with a history of Acute Ischemic Stroke and those without at p=0.05? Yes, there is a statistical significant difference in Charlson Score for patients who have and do not have a history of acute ischemic stroke. No, there is not a statistical significant difference in Charlson Score for patients who have and do not have a history of acute ischemic stroke. Question 9 True or false: More men in this dataset received tPA than women. True False Question 10 What percent of patients had tPA administered were women? Fill in just the value, i.e. 4.7, without labels. Integer, decimal, or E notation allowed Question 11 What was the p-value of the Pearson Chi-Square statistical test in the previous question (What percentage of patients had tPA administered were women?)? Fill in just the value, i.e. 4.7, without labels. Integer, decimal, or E notation allowed Question 12 At a p<0.05 level of significance, is the difference between males and females receiving tPA statistically significant? Yes, the difference between men and women receiving tPA is statistically significant.

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